THIS WEEK
Sales figures in February didn’t look very pretty really. In fact with the UK just dropping 3%, you would have to say we had a bit of a result. Spain dropped 6%, Germany was down 11%, but then China was down 80%. A figure which makes everybody else’s irrelevant really, as they represent about 20% of global sales.

On the whole, I am a great admirer of what Google has been able to achieve. They dominate the search engine market, their Android system seems pretty robust for phones and their G suite applications have given Microsoft Office a pretty good run for their money.

But a warning today not to cross them, and certainly not to leave them with any trade secrets. All of which is perfectly reasonable, but you have to feel a touch of sympathy for their ex-head of self driving cars as he declared himself bankrupt this week in the face of a $179 million lawsuit, alleging he leaked trade secrets. A lawsuit that it looks as if he will lose.  I suspect it will have the desired effect, and the next person to leave them will probably not take many secrets along.

GM has not had too much good news recently, but they have been extremely bullish over the last week, announcing their new battery or electric vehicle platform Ultrium. For a normal car, they are claiming ranges in excess of 400 miles and 0-60 times of three seconds. Quite some powertrain. And they reckon that the technology will cost two thirds of similar power units.

Clearly a very green alternative and they have promised to introduce it across much of their range by 2023. Intriguingly, however, for such a green initiative, guess the first model they plan to introduce it in? The Hummer. Well I guess if they can make a difference in that type of vehicle, then your average small family run around will be a piece of cake.

Have a great weekend – only 220 wet, rainy days until Christmas (and a few dozen dry ones)

THIS WEEK’S JOBS
Here are some jobs from the past ten days. Check these out and see if there is anything tempting. Click on the link to apply immediately through our site. The situation is changing the whole time and if any link refuses to work, it is probably because it has already been filled and removed. Check out all our jobs at on our Jobs Page

Latest Jobs
QUOTE OF THE WEEK

Perhaps in time the so-called Dark Ages will be thought of as including our own.
Georg Christoph Lichtenberg (1742 – 1799)
Nothing is as irritating as the fellow who chats pleasantly while he’s overcharging you.
Kin Hubbard (1868 – 1930)
It usually takes more than three weeks to prepare a good impromptu speech.
Mark Twain (1835 – 1910) 
The important work of moving the world forward does not wait to be done by perfect men.
George Eliot (1819 – 1880)
THIS WEEK
I was not going to talk about coronavirus this week. After all, it is covered in great depth in lots of other
media around the world. However, the cancellation of the Geneva Motor Show next week throws into focus just what an effect this virus is having on the world and its economy. Coincidentally, wearing my other hat as MD of another company, BackupHR, we are running a webinar for employers on Monday, at 11 AM, regarding what you should and shouldn’t be doing with your workforce. There are still a few places left, it will last little more than 30 minutes,  click here to register
 
Renault did not have a good year last year. Ongoing problems over the departure of its chief executive, a poor relationship with Nissan and a deteriorating market share saw their profits tumble. Today they announced they are selling some of their retail dealerships. These are in France, but it will be interesting to see if they are going to continue that trend around Europe. They claim to be Europe’s biggest retailer with over 275 outlets. If they are looking to save money, then there is an awful lot of capital and overhead tied up in such a network.
 
Some better news for VW this week, as they say that they have reached an agreement in Germany with a major consumer group who took out a class action against them. The company itself has announced they have agreed an 830 million Euro settlement. Divided between 260,000 customers, that sounds like just over €3000 a head, though apparently it depends upon the value, the spec and the age of the vehicle. Automotive News Europe reckons the scandal has cost the carmaker €30 billion so far in fines and penalties.
 
Finally, it is probably the law of unintended consequences, but the coronavirus might just be kicking into plan much wider use of online sales platforms. AM magazine reports that Geely has been the latest to launch an online service in China, sales through car showrooms plummeted 92% in the first half of February. Clearly this was largely as a result of the country’s lockdown in the face of the epidemic. The company has apparently worked on what is called a fully contactless service, even offering test drives without anybody having to come into contact with anybody else. Once you make this sort of thing happen, who knows where it will stop. Not good news for their dealers going forward.
 

Have a great weekend – don’t forget, March does not start until Sunday.
THIS WEEK’S JOBS
Here are some jobs from the past ten days. Check these out and see if there is anything tempting. Click on the link to apply immediately through our site. The situation is changing the whole time and if any link refuses to work, it is probably because it has already been filled and removed. Check out all our jobs at on our Jobs Page

Latest Jobs
QUOTE OF THE WEEK

Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted.
Albert Einstein (1879 – 1955), (attributed) 
Normal is not something to aspire to, it’s something to get away from.
Jodie Foster (1962 – )
The most radical revolutionary will become a conservative the day after the revolution.
Hannah Arendt (1906 – 1975)
I have never let my schooling interfere with my education.
Mark Twain (1835 – 1910)
THIS WEEK

If we thought the automotive world had troubles last year, welcome to 2020.

It’s been quite a week for Renault. First of all Moody’s, the ratings agency, downgraded their debt to junk status. After profits have been wiped out in the past year it is clear that analysts are punishing it, worried that it will not be able to return itself to its previous healthy state. At almost exactly the same time French prosecutors have announced a probe into Carlos Goshn, their former high-profile chief executive. They are looking into misuse of funds and abuse of corporate assets as well as things like money-laundering over the past 11 years. Things don’t get much better for him, do they? How quickly you can fall from grace.

Tesla’s German operation also had an interesting week. On Wednesday they had to stop work on their new gigafactory because of claims by environmentalists that they were cutting down trees in a precious environment. They still have not got the complete go-ahead for their new site, but the courts have allowed them to restart their felling of the forest on the new 350 acre site. Remember, this is the factory that the UK thought it had a good chance of getting, but that Brexit word got in the way. Politicians had warned that the legal battle that environmentalists were waging would  inflict serious damage on Germany’s image as a good place to do business.

I covered the Coronavirus in depth last week, but the headlines still will not go away. I love the report of Jaguar Land Rover getting parts out of China in suitcases – that Range Rover waiting on the production line is obviously worth it. And a couple of hours ago the company announced plans that it was shelving plans to sell bonds to raise cash. Apparently investors have looked at the risks around a severe downturn caused by the virus and backed away.

Finally, a number of manufacturers are getting their excuses in early. Coronavirus is to blame as there are claims that the first half of February has seen sales slump by 92% in China. Daimler, Nissan, Honda warning of serious adverse effects and are delaying production or pointing out that production in other countries will be affected. VW has seen its own sales in the country fall significantly at the start of this year. And as news of an outbreak in Korea gathers pace, I don’t expect Hyundai and Kia will be immune either.

Have a great weekend, summer is only 4 months away. 2021 only 10 away.

THIS WEEK’S JOBS
Here are some jobs from the past ten days. Check these out and see if there is anything tempting. Click on the link to apply immediately through our site. The situation is changing the whole time and if any link refuses to work, it is probably because it has already been filled and removed. Check out all our jobs at on our Jobs Page

Latest Jobs
QUOTE OF THE WEEK

To get something done, a committee should consist of no more than three men, two of whom are absent.
Robert Copeland
One can survive everything, nowadays, except death, and live down everything except a good reputation.
Oscar Wilde (1854 – 1900) 
A lie told often enough becomes the truth.
Lenin (1870 – 1924)
Always be wary of any helpful item that weighs less than its operating manual.
Terry Pratchett
THIS WEEK

They used to say “When America sweep sneezes, the whole world catches a cold”. Well, what happens when China catches coronavirus? The whole world goes into meltdown it would appear. And particularly the Nissan Renault alliance.

Shortly after announcing the appointment of its new chief executive, Luca de Meo, Renault announced its first loss in at least a decade. And to rectify it, it is planning a radical $2.2 billion cost-cutting restructure to put it back on the right track.

Losses were exacerbated by its fairly large holding in Nissan, who performed even worse than its partner. This meant that Nissan, who had contributed over €1.5 billion in 2018 to Renault’s bottom line, produced €1.3 billion less last year. Investors are not impressed, and Nissan’s share price plummeted nearly 10% on the news. The company is now valued less then much smaller marques, like Subaru and Suzuki. The last three years have not been kind to it, and its share price is down 19% this year, after a decline of 28% last year and 22% in 2018.

No wonder, then, they are suing former Chief Executive Carlos Ghosn for $90m for his alleged behaviour and misdemeanours with the company over the past decade. I guess they need every penny they can get.

When just one country like China represents a quarter of global vehicle production, then if analysts are predicting at least a 5% fall in the Chinese market (remember it normally climbs between six and 10% a year, so that might be 15% behind expectations) then everybody gets worried. Expect a slew of vehicle offers in the UK in the coming months, as European manufacturers try to divert production elsewhere.

And VW would probably like to divert attention elsewhere as well. Especially in Germany, where consumers who are suing them through a class action have turned down a settlement of nearly €1 billion so far. Negotiations are continuing, but the manufacturer once again looks set to lose another considerable amount of money, as the action continues. Not only that, the effect on its reputation in its heartland is probably incalculable. I suspect this is one they are going to have to settle quickly.

Have a great weekend, it’s probably best to leave that kite in the cupboard for at least another week.

THIS WEEK’S JOBS
Here are some jobs from the past ten days. Check these out and see if there is anything tempting. Click on the link to apply immediately through our site. The situation is changing the whole time and if any link refuses to work, it is probably because it has already been filled and removed. Check out all our jobs at
on our Jobs Page

Latest Jobs
QUOTE OF THE WEEK

I do not want people to be agreeable, as it saves me the trouble of liking them.
Jane Austen (1775 – 1817)
Age is mind over matter. If you don’t mind, it doesn’t matter.
Satchel Paige (1906 – 1982)
Lawyers spend a great deal of their time shoveling smoke.
Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. (1841 – 1935)
There is no nonsense so arrant that it cannot be made the creed of the vast majority by adequate governmental action.
Bertrand Russell (1872 – 1970)
THIS WEEK

There are a lot of headwinds for the automotive industry in 2020, but I don’t expect anybody had factored in the coronavirus is a major part of their planning. However, a sector that is grappling with electrification, balancing CO2 figures in Europe, a trade dispute between the US and China and falling consumer demand is now having to close down factories and rein back on production because of the extent of contagion across the China region.

And the analysts have started to play this game as well. They are comparing it to the SARS outbreak 16 years ago. They reckon that it could see a potential 3-5% slashed off global production if it all turns sour. But most of them are hoping that the outbreak will be mainly contained in China.

Elon Musk does not do things quietly. And he has taken great delight in the discomfort of hedge funds over the past few weeks. Apparently Tesla is the most shorted stock on the planet at the moment. And in case you do not know how shorting works, hedge funds borrow shares from something like a pension fund for say six months. They sell them in the hope of buying them back cheaper and handing them back. But it leaves you with a little bit of egg on your face if the shares double or triple in the meantime.

And since last summer, Tesla has boomed – in late May they were listed at $185. At the start of this week they were at nearly $900. In theory if you had borrowed 1m shares for 9 months, you could be looking at a loss of $71.5m. And many have found themselves in this situation, with a position to square by the end of January. It meant not only was it costing them a fortune, but as everybody was after the same stock, it’s price ratcheted up. You have to feel sorry for them, don’t you?

In fact the stock has slipped back a little this week, largely on the news that they will be cutting production in China because of the aforementioned coronavirus. Nevertheless the company is riding high compared to last year $740 as I write this, and looks as if it will make a significant profit this year too.

Which is more than may be said for some dealer groups in 2020. Figures in January look pretty dire, even though many of the groups I have spoken to are of the opinion that the market has picked up. For many this is franchise specific, and any dealer over reliant on diesel is likely to remain in a pretty poor place. Digital registrations are now back to 2000 levels, when they formed less than 20% of registrations.

Have a great weekend, I would not bother getting your kite out for Sunday.

THIS WEEK’S JOBS
Here are some jobs from the past ten days. Check these out and see if there is anything tempting. Click on the link to apply immediately through our site. The situation is changing the whole time and if any link refuses to work, it is probably because it has already been filled and removed. Check out all our jobs at on our Jobs Page

Latest Jobs
QUOTE OF THE WEEK

About the time we think we can make ends meet, somebody moves the ends.
Herbert Hoover (1874 – 1964)
Humor is our way of defending ourselves from life’s absurdities by thinking absurdly about them.
Lewis Mumford (1895 – 1990)
The trouble with having an open mind, of course, is that people will insist on coming along and trying to put things in it.
Terry Pratchett
Estimated amount of glucose used by an adult human brain each day, expressed in M&Ms: 250
Harper’s Index, October 1989
THIS WEEK

Today is 31st January. Which is occupying you more? Transfer deadline day, your tax return, or our departure from the EU? Having just returned from a trip to Europe today, no doubt it will be some time before any citizens notice any difference in our relationship. Though many continue to see it as a cause for celebration or recrimination, depending upon which side of the argument you come down on.

There was, however, some good news this week for the automotive manufacturing industry in this country. After a big slump last year, it was good news on a number of levels. You may have seen the headlines, UPS has ordered up to 20,000 new vehicles from a start-up company, Arrival. They have been manufacturing rechargeable light commercial vehicles for a little while, but in small numbers. But have also been working very closely with a number of key clients, such as UPS, to design their next generation of vehicles. And these will be completely re-engineered from the ground up. Not only that, so will the manufacturing process.

And the good news is that their main factory is in Banbury. At present they employ 400 people, of which more than half are in the UK. And the revolution? This is very much a modular production model, producing major components in a number of different places before finally assembling them. Dare I say it, much like PCs are created nowadays. Someone produces a hard drive, another the processor, another the memory and the motherboards. The assembler gathers all this together and then bolts them into place. Compare this to Tesla’s model, they have built one of the largest factories in the world in China, producing 500,000 vehicles. Study it – Arrival’s model is more nimble, more adaptable, less capital intensive and less risky.

And talking about risk, did any of you put any money on Aston Martin over the past few months? Looking at the headlines this week, perhaps you should have done. It would appear that Lawrence Stroll, head of the Formula One racing team, has injected an enormous amount of capital, and renamed his team Aston Martin racing, saving the company and reinvigorating it. Shares today have shot up as a result.
Have a great weekend, enjoy your first few days out of Europe.
THIS WEEK’S JOBS
Here are some jobs from the past ten days. Check these out and see if there is anything tempting. Click on the link to apply immediately through our site. The situation is changing the whole time and if any link refuses to work, it is probably because it has already been filled and removed. Check out all our jobs at on our Jobs Page

Latest Jobs
QUOTE OF THE WEEK

It is not easy to find happiness in ourselves, and it is not possible to find it elsewhere.
Agnes Repplier (1855 – 1950)
Though it sounds absurd, it is true to say I felt younger at sixty than I felt at twenty.
Ellen Glasgow (1873 – 1945), The Woman Within, 1954
It is very strange that the years teach us patience – that the shorter our time, the greater our capacity for waiting.
Elizabeth Taylor (1932 – ), “A Wreath of Roses”
Keep cool and you command everybody.
Louis de Saint-Just (1767 – 1794)
THIS WEEK

Apologies, this week I am going to talk about technology again. Because, let us face it, that is the future of the motor industry. Reading this week’s  headlines, you have to ask whether Tesla is the new Microsoft or Apple, the company that disrupted the market so much that it came to dominate it.

In a week that it passed VW in terms of market capitalisation of $100bn, after a month when its share price had surged by something like 30%, is Tesla finally turning a corner? With its 500,000 unit new manufacturing facility in China, and its massive factory announced in Berlin, is it expanding so fast it will become unstoppable? And will the UK rue the day that it missed out on that very same factory last year?

$100bn is a big number, but to underline the fact that Tesla is seen as a serious threat, see if you can catch the interview with VW Group CEO Herbert Diess on Bloomberg. His message – “We are coming for Tesla”. VW has called on their management team to become much more agile and adapt to the new market reality, or lose ground rapidly. “The company which adapts fastest and is most innovative but also which has enough scale in the New World will make the race” he said.

VW is also investing heavily in car sharing, including the WeShare car sharing scheme. This will extend across most of Europe, but the UK has been excluded. BMW and Daimler last month also withdrew a similar car sharing scheme from the UK. Despite worries this was down to Brexit, apparently it has been down to a lack of interest from consumers. But the German manufacturers definitely see a future in car sharing platforms, just not in the UK. I guess they are hedging their bets, in case it becomes the new reality of automotive “ownership”.

Have a great weekend, enjoy the cricket while you finish off your tax return.

THIS WEEK’S JOBS
Here are some jobs from the past ten days. Check these out and see if there is anything tempting. Click on the link to apply immediately through our site. The situation is changing the whole time and if any link refuses to work, it is probably because it has already been filled and removed. Check out all our jobs at on our Jobs Page

Latest Jobs
QUOTE OF THE WEEK

The most incomprehensible thing about the world is that it is at all comprehensible.
Albert Einstein (1879 – 1955)
When you’re through changing, you’re through.
Bruce Barton 
There’s only one way to have a happy marriage and as soon as I learn what it is I’ll get married again.
Clint Eastwood (1930 – )
You can discover what your enemy fears most by observing the means he uses to frighten you.
Eric Hoffer (1902 – 1983)
THIS WEEK

We stand on the threshold of another year. Of another decade. But it is impossible to overemphasise how fast the current pace of change is.

Look at the headlines in The Financial Times, Automotive News Europe, or even the Wall Street Journal. Serious players like VW have stuck their hands up and said they need urgent reform. “They do not want to be the next Nokia”. Serious analysts are looking at the structure of the European and world automotive industry and saying the changes needed are fundamental and urgent. Consumers are looking at the world and saying unless we all make changes, then things like climate change and environmental damage could become irreversible not just for a grandchildren, but for our children and ourselves. And 2020 is a crucial year for the EU and for European car manufacturers in particular, as they face up to the challenge of CO2 emissions and enormous fines for getting it wrong.

Let me read you headlines from the front of one of the leading European automotive websites. “Fiat Chrysler and iPhone maker plan Chinese EV joint venture”. “Germany plans aid for struggling auto industry”. “Toyota makes a new $394 million bet on the flying taxis. “VW needs urgent reforms to avoid Nokia’s fate”.  That is just the top four headlines, change will define this decade like never before.

Added to which, every single manufacturer that we know is urgently talking about electric vehicles and hybridisation. Some are very late to the party others, such as Tesla, are completely new entrants to the market.

To my mind this harks back to the mid-80s when computerisation had just begun. At first the technology was pretty rudimentary, highly inefficient and early adopters spent a fortune on implementing a computerised solution. I remember the first serious computer for our business cost £12,500 in 1989, it had 100K of RAM and 1 MB of hard disk storage. Most wristwatches and Fitbits have more computing power nowadays and can be bought for as little as £15. So it will prove with this new technology, and over the next 10 years we will not be able to believe the pace of change.

And this is what is worrying retailers everywhere. Because as technology changes so rapidly, so do retail and aftersales models. I have used this analogy before, but it was the 50th anniversary of the moon landing last year. Many families bought a colour TV to be able to watch it (irony of ironies, all footage was in black-and-white) and just a few years later all TVs moved from being valve based to transistor-based. Your high street TV shop employed teams of technicians and used to rely on a six-month service and valve replacement in the old TVs, just like current motorcars. Within five years that service became irrelevant. How long before electric vehicles make our industry go the same way?

And in case anyone thought that the European car market was going berserk, it was up 21% year-on-year in December, think again. The smart money is on vehicle manufacturers destocking last year all of their gas guzzling models, because this year they are going to be judged on their model mix and emissions. So they had to clear the decks before 31 December.Have a great weekend. Enjoy the cricket.

THIS WEEK’S JOBS
Here are some jobs from the past ten days. Check these out and see if there is anything tempting. Click on the link to apply immediately through our site. The situation is changing the whole time and if any link refuses to work, it is probably because it has already been filled and removed. Check out all our jobs at on our Jobs Page

Latest Jobs
QUOTE OF THE WEEK

I always wanted to be somebody, but I should have been more specific.
Jane Wagner, (and Lily Tomlin)
The great tragedy of Science – the slaying of a beautiful hypothesis by an ugly fact.
Thomas H. Huxley (1825 – 1895)
It is easier to fight for one’s principles than to live up to them.
Alfred Adler (1870 – 1937) 
My life has no purpose, no direction, no aim, no meaning, and yet I’m happy. I can’t figure it out. What am I doing right?
Charles M. Schulz (1922 – 2000)
THIS WEEK

Happy New Year.
With 2020 vision, a few people might have made some different choices over the last couple of years. Perhaps investors would not have been so keen to plough into Aston Martins IPO back in 2018. And perhaps shareholders would have bailed out at the start of last year had they known that shares would plummet by around 80%. It certainly has not been helped by a profit warning this week.
There are some potential glimmers of hope on the horizon, however, with the long awaited DBX about to launch in the early part of this year, and reports that Geely, the Chinese car company that owns Volvo and Lotus, as well as quite a sizeable chunk of Daimler, is reported to be interested in buying a stake in the company and providing much needed finance.

And perhaps Carlos Ghosn might have done things differently. So he did not have to be smuggled out of Japan in a music crate. No doubt his escape will be written about for many years, and his holidays to Japan will not be as frequent as before.

But his appearance in Lebanon was a real surprise to everyone. And it is what this has done to the relationship between Renault and Nissan that is much more relevant to our industry. Because the analysts reckon that any tie-up is pretty dead in the water. Arndt Ellinghorst, one of the leading analysts in the City, has written a report this week on precisely why this relationship went sour. He dates it back to when the French government took an extra slice of Renault and effectively blocked Nissan’s influence on the Renault board, while leaving Renault with a big influence on Nissan. He cannot see the alliance being salvaged unless the French side sell down some of their shareholdings so both parties return much more to equal participants. And he does not think this will happen.

But he does think that the subsequent revelations from Mr Ghosn will also be quite damaging, as they will probably highlight mistakes, mistrust and open animosity in the relationship. Whatever the outcome, Renault almost certainly needs a global partner of some sort, and at the moment there are not many choices out there.

On a brighter note, many of my clients are reporting that, despite this being early days, the market looks a little more buoyant this year than it did last. Whether this is the Boris effect, the relief of getting an election out of the way, or just leaving behind a particularly disappointing decade, only time will tell. But there are some green shoots out there.

Have a great weekend, only 343 shopping days till Christmas.

THIS WEEK’S JOBS
Here are some jobs from the past ten days. Check these out and see if there is anything tempting. Click on the link to apply immediately through our site. The situation is changing the whole time and if any link refuses to work, it is probably because it has already been filled and removed. Check out all our jobs at on our Jobs Page

Latest Jobs
QUOTE OF THE WEEK

The man who says he is willing to meet you halfway is usually a poor judge of distance.
Laurence J. Peter (1919 – 1988)
The trouble with being poor is that it takes up all of your time.
Willem de Kooning (1904 – )
Take care of the luxuries and the necessities will take care of themselves.
Dorothy Parker (1893 – 1967)
We confess our little faults to persuade people that we have no large ones.
Francois de La Rochefoucauld (1613 – 1680)
THIS WEEK

While there we go, the end of another decade.  It is interesting to see how the industry has progressed over that time. In 2010 there was a total of just over 2m new cars sold. This year the predictions are around 2.3m, despite a substantial year on year fall. Much of this is blamed on Brexit and WLTP. Car manufacturing, however, has stood fairly static. The SMMT reported a continued fall in manufacturing last month, it estimates that we will finish the year on 1.3m vehicles. In 2010, production was at almost identical levels. At that point, Vauxhall and Ford held the top four places between for sales by model, with only the BMW 3 series in 8th position as any sort of contender from the premium bracket. By 2019 the Mercedes-Benz a class was the fifth biggest seller, propelling the manufacturer very much into the volume sphere.

But it has probably not been the finest 10 years for the UK automotive industry. The similarity between the start and end of the decade disguises how things boomed in the middle. By 2016 we were producing well over 1.8 million vehicles a year, and car registrations of nearly 2.7 million. Analysts sadly are optimistic for the start of the next decade. Continuing economic turmoil, an industry very much in flux and the EU bearing down with severe emissions restrictions, most predict that manufacturing will continue to fall, and we will be lucky to sell more vehicles next year than we have this.

Nevertheless, groups like Marshalls continue to see the upside in the industry. They completed their purchase of 6 VW businesses from Jardines this week, and added in a new Volvo business, purchased from Vertu. The Volvo dealerships are part of a franchise very much on the rise, with accelerated electrification and significant investment from their Chinese parents. Marshalls now own 7 Volvo businesses, a substantial portion of the manufacturer’s network.

This week also saw the confirmation that FCA and PSA (Fiat, Chrysler and Peugeot group) a set to finalise their merger in the coming year. This will make the world’s fourth largest car manufacturer, and will give them significant toehold is in markets all around the globe. Quite what it will mean for the U.K.’s Vauxhall manufacturing plants, however, is unclear. Though many are sceptical that they can survive.

This will be our last newsletter of 2019. Our thanks to all of our customers, candidates and interested parties over the past year. It has certainly been an intriguing ride. Enjoy your Christmas break and happy new decade.

THIS WEEK’S JOBS
Here are some jobs from the past ten days. Check these out and see if there is anything tempting. Click on the link to apply immediately through our site. The situation is changing the whole time and if any link refuses to work, it is probably because it has already been filled and removed. Check out all our jobs at on our Jobs Page

Latest Jobs
QUOTE OF THE WEEK

It is always easier to believe than to deny. Our minds are naturally affirmative.
John Burroughs (1837 – 1921)
What we anticipate seldom occurs; what we least expected generally happens.
Benjamin Disraeli (1804 – 1881)
Gratitude is merely the secret hope of further favours.
Francois de La Rochefoucauld (1613 – 1680)
Most conversations are simply monologues delivered in the presence of witnesses.
Margaret Millar
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